Saturday, August 15, 2009

Tough times never last, but tough taxi drivers do!

UK has a taxi driver who blogs in "Adventures of a Taxi Driver". And Singapore has a taxi driver who also blogs (his is "A Singapore Taxi Driver's Diary") and yet his style of writings are more appealing (despite the fact that he has a PhD from Stanford and used to have a research job.)

I have every respect possible for any taxi drivers who are honest, capable & committed to send me to reach to my destination without much detours.

Well, I do know it's a tough job. Imagine that you need to know how to go about from one place to another.

And to think that there is even now a taxi driver who has been documenting about his experiences in his blog. How he has to juggle whatever remaining hours of his day between driving the taxi, spending time with his family & blogging.

I truly wish him the best of luck in life. Hope to read his story in the printed newspaper (Someone who claimed to be a journalist with The New Paper did recently attempt to contact him in his first post, "Preface".) and perhaps, it may land him to a job that may have suited him better.

If I'm not mistaken the Straits Times on Sundays do publish a segment about people looking for a job, right?

PS. The title of this post is ripped off inspired from a Robert H. Schuller's quote, “Tough times never last, but tough people do”.



Update on 19/08: it's good to read how Dr Cai Ming is featured in Asiaone & in Straits Times. Hope that good publicity will help him secure a job that suits him better.

Dr Cai Ming Jie became an SMRT cabby last November after spending 16 years as a researcher at the Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB) of the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*Star).

His career switch has become a talking point online after he started a blog earlier this year. Alongside his experiences as a cabby, he takes issue with the circumstances of his departure from IMCB last May.

The China-born Dr Cai, who became a Singapore citizen, obtained a PhD in molecular biology from Stanford University in 1990.

From Asiaone, "S'pore's most highly educated taxi-driver".

Could this be Singapore's most well qualified taxi driver?

Dr Cai Ming Jie became an SMRT cabby last November after spending 16 years as a researcher at the Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB) of the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*Star).

His career switch has become a talking point online after he started a blog earlier this year. Alongside his experiences as a cabby, he takes issue with the circumstances of his departure from IMCB last May.

An SMRT spokesman confirmed that the former researcher is a driver with SMRT Taxis, but Dr Cai declined to add more beyond this: 'All that needs to be said is on the blog online...It should be IMCB that needs to be asked questions, if any.'

The China-born Dr Cai, who became a Singapore citizen, obtained a PhD in molecular biology from Stanford University in 1990. The Straits Times learnt that he did a two-year postdoctoral fellowship after leaving Stanford at the University of Washington, under famed genetist Professor Lee Hartwell, who won a 2001 Nobel Prize in physiology.

He joined IMCB two years later and worked as a principal investigator in the field of cell genetics up till his departure.

A spokesman for A*Star, meanwhile, said renewal of all its researchers' contracts is based on a number of factors, including the time taken to train PhD students, their performance and their contributions to the research institutes and the agency in general.

Dr Cai's work, like that of all A*Star researchers, was assessed by an external Scientific Advisory Board (SAB), which recommended his contract be terminated.

Still, in spite of the submission of countless curriculum vitaes and applications to universities, government agencies and companies since he was told he would be let go in 2007, Dr Cai failed to get a successful response.

The former researcher now drives a four-year -old Toyota Crown. 'At a time like this, the taxi business is probably the only business in Singapore that still actively recruits people,' he said.

From Straits Times, "PhD holder now a cabby".

2 comments:

mrdes said...

Agreed, agreed, the UK tax driver's writing is interesting. Makes me think writing goes beyond formal education.

The Oriental Express said...

I have posted my thoughts about Dr. Cai in my blog http://ganchau.blogspot.com

Hope my article will pull the heart-strings of someone to help Dr. Cai to make full use of his talent, experience and skill.